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Bruce Willis “Not Totally Verbal” Amid Dementia Battle, Says Moonlighting Creator..

One of Hollywood’s most recognizable stars, Bruce Willis, is battling a difficult health issue. His family made the announcement that he was giving up acting in March 2022 after learning that he had aphasia, a linguistic condition that impairs speech and cognition. His aphasia had developed into frontotemporal dementia (FTD), a degenerative brain condition that can alter personality, conduct, and language, according to information provided by his family in June 2023.

People between the ages of 45 and 65 are most commonly affected by FTD, an uncommon kind of dementia. The frontal and temporal lobes of the brain, which are in charge of executive function, language, and social conduct, are what cause it. FTD is incurable and extremely painful for both the sufferer and their loved ones.

Glenn Gordon Caron, who created the 1980s television program Moonlighting, which starred Willis, recently gave an interview to the New York Post and provided some details on the actor’s present health. Willis, according to Caron, is “not totally verbal” and “sees life through a screen door.” But he said, Willis still recognizes him and calls him “Bruce.”

He is still there, according to Caron. “When you’re with him you know that he’s Bruce and you’re grateful that he’s there, but the joie de vivre is gone.”

The situation of Willis has also been discussed by his relatives. They stated that Willis is “receiving great care” in a statement made public in June 2023 and that they are “grateful for the outpouring of love and support we have received from his fans.”

“As a result of this illness, Bruce is walking away from the career that has meant so much to him,” claimed the statement.  “This is a truly challenging time for our family and we appreciate your continued understanding, compassion, and respect.”

The news of Willis’ diagnosis serves as a reminder of the terrible effects dementia can have on sufferers and their families. It serves as a reminder of the significance

of promoting studies into this illness in order to discover fresh therapies and solutions.

Frontotemporal dementia (FTD): What is it?

People between the ages of 45 and 65 are most commonly affected by FTD, an uncommon kind of dementia. The frontal and temporal lobes of the brain, which are in charge of executive function, language, and social conduct, are what cause it.

FTD mostly comes in three forms:

  • The most typical form of FTD is behavioral variation FTD (bvFTD). Changes in personality and conduct, such as being more distant, apathetic, or impetuous, are what define it.
  • Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a form of FTD that is characterized by communication and language issues.
  • FTD-MND: This kind of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is defined by a confluence of FTD symptoms and motor neuron disease symptoms, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

Since FTD is a progressive condition, it deteriorates with time. FTD cannot be cured, however there are therapies that can help control the symptoms.

Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) symptoms

Depending on the kind of FTD and the disease’s stage, the symptoms of FTD might change. Some typical signs include:

  1. psychological and behavioural changes, such as becoming more reclusive, apathetic, or impulsive.
  2. language and communication issues, such as having trouble comprehending what others are saying or finding the correct words to use.
  3. difficulty with executive functions including organizing, planning, and problem-solving.
  4. loss of movement and muscular coordination.
  5. Changes in behavior, such as becoming more abrasive or unrestrained.

Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) diagnosis

FTD cannot be diagnosed with a single test. A medical history, physical examination, and a battery of cognitive tests are frequently used by doctors to make the diagnosis of FTD.

Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) treatment

FTD cannot be cured, however there are therapies that can help control the symptoms. These remedies might consist of:

  1. drugs to enhance cognitive performance and lessen behavioral issues.
  2. Using speech therapy to address communication issues.
  3. Help with daily life skills through occupational therapy.
  4. the use of physical therapy to address mobility issues.
  5. organisations offering assistance to patients and their carers.

How to assist a person who has frontotemporal dementia (FTD)

There are several things you may do to help a friend or family member who has been diagnosed with FTD:

  • Be understanding and patient.
  • Help out with regular chores including cooking, cleaning, and transportation.
  • Encourage them to continue participating in social and active.

 

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